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Posted on in Divorce

RigsOften, the question of how a divorce differs from an annulment arises. Put simply, a divorce is a legal process that results in the marital bonds being severed. An annulment, on the other hand, is a legal process that results in the marriage being invalidated, as though it never existed in the eyes of the law.

In today's society, divorces are by far the more common method of terminating a marriage. With divorce, however, there is a presumption that the marriage was valid and any assets acquired during the marriage belong to the marital estate, which means that the judge will divide the assets equitably between the parties

If the judge grants an annulment, however, the marriage was not valid from the beginning, which means that there never was a marital estate, and the parties may get to keep their respective assets.

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LauraA new study has found that those individuals with more brothers and sisters are less likely to divorce when compared with children who have only one or two siblings. The research explores whether the number of siblings a child has influences their likelihood of divorce in adulthood.

The results of the study are certainly an advertisement for larger families that create adults who are less likely to obtain a divorce. The research found that each additional sibling (with a cap of seven) cuts down a person's likelihood of obtaining a divorce attorney in the future by approximately 2%. The information was collected from the information regarding 57,061 adults in the General Social Survey, and this information was collected between 1972 and 2012.

Ohio State University sociologist Doug Downey is a co-author of the study. He points out that his research team has been successful in finding other determining factors that influence divorce to a more significant level, but that the impact of number of siblings is important and an expected result. The research is being presented at the American Sociological Association meeting currently behind held in New York City.

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Going through a divorce is a hard enough thing to do on its own, throw children into the mix and it can become an extremely stressful situation.  Many people give advice on what to say to your kids when telling them about your divorce, "I will always love you", etc.  However, not many people know what you should not say when breaking the news to your children.

LaraDon't share too many details

Remember that your children are in fact children.  They do not need to be let in on the dramatic details and reasons for your divorce.  In many cases, kids will ask questions about what caused it.  If the questions become too much, you can always tell them that some of the reasons are "adult in nature."  Try to answer their questions without divulging too much information.

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The cost of divorce doesn't always just refer to the price tag for an attorney's services. Especially for marriages in which one spouse was the primary earner, the process of sorting out the financials is difficult and sometimes complicated. Oftentimes women get stuck with a financial burden that's too much to bear. Knowing what to do before a divorce is essential for either spouse, but it's especially important that the non-primary earner take steps before a divorce to maintain financial solvency after the split. According to WIFE.org, "divorce is the largest single financial transaction of most people's lives." Important first steps include canceling all joint accounts and opening private accounts that your spouse doesn't have access to. In the same vein, before you separate (especially if the divorce is your idea, it's not necessarily slated to be amicable, and you're not the primary earner) WIFE.org suggests to "use joint funds to repair your automobile and home, buy clothes for yourself and your children, and other family expenses." Starting off the split with joint expenses paid will save arguments down the line as to who should be responsible for paying them.  Maintaining Financial Solvency Through Divorce IMAGE

Having said that, if you didn't prepare financially for divorce before the process was in full swing, it doesn't mean it's too late. According to CNN Money Magazine, the three most important "fixes" to financial insolvency after divorce are to "follow the money, reschedule retirement, and keep renting." To follow the money is to carefully (obsessively, even) track what you're spending and how you're spending it. Adjusting to a single income after becoming accustomed to two isn't necessarily an easy process. You can do "a thorough analysis of cash flow using a program like Quicken," according to CNN.

Retirement plans will likely have to be flexible upon divorce—that may mean working another five years, or planning to put away more into a 401k or other retirement plan each year. Another life plan that may have to be reconsidered is home ownership. For many divorced or divorcing couples it's smarter to keep renting and put the money you may have used on a down payment away for emergencies.

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Posted on in Divorce

There are several reasons to get divorced. There are money issues, varying degrees of interest in starting a family, arguments about lifestyles and social events, and differences regarding where to live and what expectations are of a spouse. And yet there's one disagreement in which it's more difficult to find compromise than the rest—regarding each other's sexual preferences. According to Psychology Today, if "two people in a monogamous relationship are not in agreement on sexual matters—when to have it, where to have it, or how to have it—there is rarely a satisfactory compromise," unlike other arguments that can often be resolved with a little give and take on both sides. Mismatched Sex Lives Lead to Divorce IMAGE

Isadora Alman, writing for Psychology Today, says that at least to her, the obvious solution would seem to be to advise the members of the disagreeing couple to seek sexual satisfaction elsewhere, rather than trying to change something so deeply engrained. However, simple as this solution may seem on paper, "sadly, this is not a solution that works for many, if any," she says. While "a preference for a certain amount of sex at certain times and in particular ways can be modified by an act of will—sometimes," according to Alman, sometimes people in disparate relationships such as this need to seek what they crave elsewhere—even if they decide to remain monogamous. A need to be touched, for example, can be soothed by children, an affectionate pet, or massages. "One's partner does not have to satisfy all the person's emotional needs nor does sex have to carry the total burden of their expression," according to Alman.

And yet there may be some recourse for couples with mismatched sexual libidos and lifestyles, according to Alternet.org. One thing to try is to rethink the "circumstances in which you have sex," according to Alternet. "Look at the times and the circumstances when you've been having sex… and then look at the times and circumstances when you want to have sex. Then try to tailor your sex life around the times and situations when you're feeling frisky."

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