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TX high asset divorceIf you are planning for a high net worth divorce in Texas and have children from your marriage, you are probably worrying about how they will fare emotionally. Generally speaking, children from higher-income households tend to do better in school and tend to have more educational opportunities. However, according to a recent study, a family’s income level might not be a deciding factor when a child’s parents get divorced. To be sure, parental divorce, often regardless of the parents’ income level, leads kids to have a lower grade point average and to struggle, at least in the short term, in school.

Whether you have questions about high net worth divorce in Austin, TX generally or specific questions about kids in an Austin divorce, a Texas high asset divorce lawyer at our firm can help.

Your Child’s Education May Suffer Temporarily Due to Divorce

According to the recent study, children and adolescents with divorced or separated parents do less well in school than adolescents with non-divorced parents. Indeed, at least in the short term, teens with recently divorced parents had a GPA that was lower by 0.3 points, on average, than kids with non-divorced parents. Yet it is important to remember that these effects usually are limited, and as long as parents commit to their child’s education, a GPA can bounce back.

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college tuition in child custody agreement, Texas high-asset divorce attorney, Texas complex litigation lawyer,With tassels turning on mortarboards throughout Central Texas, this question is a popular one in divorced families throughout the area. While the short answer is "no, unless the child is still in high school or is disabled" there are some nuances in child support law that both parents should be aware of.

The Law

There is some basis for a post-majority support claim to pay for college expenses. Section 154.123(9) allows the judge to consider "the expenses for a son or daughter for education beyond secondary school" when setting the amount. Forward-thinking parents can use this provision to increase the amount of regular support for minor children by a few dollars a month, and require the obligee parent to set those funds aside exclusively for post-secondary expenses.

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